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The Horsemen’s Corral Magazine serves the horse industry in OH, KY, WV, PA, MI and IN with the most comprehensive source of equine marketing that includes Print, Radio, and Social Media plus nearly 100 personal appearances by our own Professional Equine Announcer. The Horsemen’s Corral is “Your One Source for the Horse”!


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The Battle of Gettysburg & the History of the Civil War Horse

by Bobbie Coalter
Photos courtesy of Courtney Leasure

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Editor’s Note: This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. There will be many events honoring this time in our history, including the Pennsylvania Quarter Horse Associations Gettysburg Ride, September 13-15. The Horsemen’s Corral is honored to take part in this event. We will participate in the trail ride and Joe will be the MC and conduct Cowboy Church. Come join us for the ride, campfire,ghost stories and fellowship as we honor the many soldier, civilians and equines that lost their lives from July 1-3, 1863.

Horses have long been retired from the United States military, but back during the Civil War, a bloody and tragic time in our history, horses and other equines were as necessary to the Union and Confederate soldiers as military vehicles are to our modern day soldiers. Both armies used equines to carry equipment to the front lines, men into battle and the injured to camp hospitals. Most horses did not survive their enlistment, since shooting and killing them first during a battle meant a disadvantage to the enemy; cavalrymen ended up on foot making an easy target, and artillery could not be moved into strategic positions. General George Armstrong Custer is said to have 11 mounts shot out from under him during the war, including two in one day at the Battle of Gettysburg.
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Notes From Inside The Corral (July 2013 issue)

Tiny Cowboy
The Promise of Youth. This adorable picture of little cowboy Craig Miller started me thinking about the future of the equine industry. At 22 months this pint size cowboy is all in, but where will he be with horses 22 years from now? Will he be trail riding, competing, training, or maybe graduating from an Equine studies program? Will he still be involved with horses in any way; or will the demands of his young adult years make a life with horses impossible, allowing for only his memories to be tied to them?
The American Horse Council reports that there are 6.9 million horses in the United States for both commercial and recreational use and the total impact of the industry on the gross domestic product (GDP) is 112.1 billion dollars. These are impressive numbers but we all know that the industry is in trouble. When looking at predictions for the future, experts agree that land loss and the lack of interest and involvement of young people are the two greatest threats it’s facing.
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Horses and Alfalfa

by Eleanor Blazer

Is alfalfa best hay for horses?

The word alfalfa comes from the Arabic word “alfasfasha”.  Loosely translated it means “the best fodder”.
But, is it?

Read entire article by subscribing to the Horsemen’s Corral.

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The EIA Myth: How Your Equine Veterinarian is Scamming You

The EIA Myth: how your equine veterinarian is scamming you! is the latest Kindle book by author, trainer, trader and teacher Don Blazer.

“The dangers of EIA (equine infectious anemia) are a made-up crisis designed to keep cash rolling in year after year by requiring a Coggins test on all horses going to public places or crossing state lines,” Blazer says.

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Early Rangerbred History

The cornerstone for the Rangerbred Horse was laid in 1878 when General U.S. Grand, during a world tour, visited Sultan Abdul Hamid of Turkey. As a token of deep friendship, the old Sultan presented the General with two desert stallions on the day of his departure. One was an Arabian named Leopard, the other a Barb named Linden Tree.
These stallions reached Virginia early in 1879 where they attracted the attention of one of America’s greatest horsemanship, Randolph Huntington of New York and Virginia.

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Not Just a Trail Horse Anymore…

Whether you are a mounted shooter, team roper, barrel racer or a pleasure rider, your horse will benefit from time away from the stress and routine of an arena. Keeping a horse mentally fresh is a key part of success inside the arena, and the American Competitive Trail Horse Association (ACTHA) is a great way to do just that.
Co-founder Carrie Scrima formed the Texas-originated ACTHA as a way for families and friends to get together and demonstrate their horsemanship skills out on the trail. This is not a speed, ‘extreme -type’ or endurance event, it’s a safe casual pace which covers an average of six miles and has a minimum of six judged obstacles. Judged obstacles are as natural as possible and can range from crossing water, stepping over logs, opening gates to going up and down embankments. Rides take around two to two and a half hours. Rides start with a briefing before trail riders head out, followed by lunch and awards.

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The Pathway To Horsemanship – by Dan Steers & Dan James

The Corral Welcomes Our New Feature Writers From Double Dan Horsemanship – Dan Steers & Dan James

When Dan James and I met on the El Caballo Spanish Horse Centre in Western Australia we quickly realized that our training styles complemented each other so we developed and began performing a show together called “The Dan and Dan Show”. In 2009, we left Western Australia moving to New South Wales to begin training with one of the world’s elite liberty horse trainers, Heath Harris. Heath, having more than 40 years of experience welcomed us into his program and willingly shared his training techniques.  Dan James and I took the knowledge that Heath had shared with us and developed the Double Dan Horsemanship training method: Ground Control, Long Reining, Body Control Under Saddle and Liberty.
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