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The Horsemen’s Corral Magazine serves the horse industry in OH, KY, WV, PA, MI and IN with the most comprehensive source of equine marketing that includes Print, Radio, and Social Media plus nearly 100 personal appearances by our own Professional Equine Announcer. The Horsemen’s Corral is “Your One Source for the Horse”!


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Seville Horse Property FOR SALE

6.89 ACRES of HOSRE property!!! 1600 SqFt Livestock Stable with 6 stalls, an additional 400 SqFt has been added to the Stable, plus a Lean To (appx 144 SqFt) This Colonial Home was Built in 2000, 5 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Hardwood Floors, Office or Bonus Room, Basement, Wood Deck, Pool, All Appliances included! This Beautiful Property is a MUST SEE! Call or Text Allise Hendricks (216) 410-2218

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Quiet disposition. Flashy blue/white roan. UTD on vaccines. Stands for farrier and bathing. Loads easily on and off trailer. Used as a trail horse for past 6 year. Gaited. Excellent ground manners. Video and more pictures upon request. Located in Lodi Ohio. Asking $2500 or best offer.

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PATH certified instructor wanted

Therapeutic riding program in northwest Ohio searching for a part-time PATH certified instructor. Please contact Laurie at 419-779-0756

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Farm Tack Liquidation Sale

We have 15 years of show and work Tack and clothing we are selling. Stubben Siegfried Saddle, Western work saddle, Brand new Reinsmen Silver Series Show saddle, Lots of bits; english, western and training. Saddle blankets and pads, winter blankets, summer sheets, coolers, leg wraps, oster grooming sets.

Please call or text Carol Smith at 330-416-0268 or e-mail: wpfarm44253@aol.com

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Pegasus All Aluminum Trailer

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The Pegasus trailer was designed using aircraft quality aluminum for strength to last a long time. They fitted the trailer onto an Airstream chasis for the best ride available. Has a newer wood floor and heavy duty mats. Two horse walk through, tack/feed area in front of horses, bumper pull, ramp. A very solid trailer for hauling where ever you want to take your horse. $4200 Lynne 330-659-6007

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1998 Coachmen Truck Camper

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1998 Coachmen Truck Camper 11.5 ft long
Looks good inside and out. Generator, refrigerator, bathroom with shower, stereo. We used ours on our F350 to camp with the horses. You need a heavy duty truck to haul this camper, as it is a large truck camper. $3900.00. Call 419-684-7304. Located in Castalia.

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The Role of the Outside Rein

Terry Myers
by Terry Myers

Anyone who has ever ridden with me knows that I preach the importance of the outside rein to the point where my wife says when I die she is going to put on my tombstone ‘More Outside Rein.’ You hear and read about the importance of getting a horse soft in the bridle and giving to the bit laterally. Most people focus on this so much, that they actually get the horse forehand heavy because they never take their training to the next step. Don’t get me wrong, getting a horse that will give to the bit is a very important step in training a horse. Once a horse is soft in their neck and their body (gives the ribcage and you can push the hip to the inside), it’s time to go to the next step…the outside rein.
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Sugar
I wanted to let you know that the subject of my editorial last month, Joey, our rescued Arabian, passed away in the pasture the middle of January. When we found him down on his side, alive but unable to get up, we immediately called our vet. He thinks Joey’s heart may have given out possibly from the neglect he suffered over the years prior to our rescue. Maybe it was his kidneys shutting down from a disease he came to us with, or maybe it was one of a multitude of other reasons. No matter, Joey’s passing hurts just the same, especially after starting to develop a bond with him once he began trusting us. Although Joey left all too soon on a winter’s day, it was one of the warmer ones we’ve seen for a while and the sun was shining brightly while he was in the pasture with his buddies. Our sweet little Joey died with a full belly, his herd gathered round, and the people who loved him by his side.
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Bobbie as a spectator2In Search of Mr. Slick

Brrrrrr! What a cold finish to fall and start to winter. I always write my editorial just a couple of days before we send the current month’s issue of the Corral to the printer. So right now, we are between snow storms, Christmas is next week, (of course I’m not ready), and it’s cold! I’m not just cold when I’m outside; I’m cold inside too. If it were summer I’d be turning the air conditioner down to 70. But in the winter, it’s all I can do to stay away from the thermostat so I don’t turn it up to 72, or 3 or 4. Why is that?
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New Year, New Horse?

Terry Myersby Terry Myers

With the New Year and the potential for a new riding season, many equine enthusiasts will find themselves in the market for a new horse. Here is an update from a previous article that I feel makes logical, yet important points to remember…
When you find yourself in the market to buy a horse, there is much to consider. Your first decision is defining what your goals are with a new equine partner. Will you be showing and what discipline(s), trail riding, working livestock or do you just want to play and have fun? How much time do you realistically have to ride and work with your horse? Do you have the financial stability to buy and care for your horse as well as purchase all the necessary tack and equipment? What do you need in terms of age and experience in a horse? Do you have the knowledge and “know how” to keep yourself and your horse safe after the purchase? We will try to address each of these questions in this article.
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by Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.

Stress = Obesity
That’s right. Stress is keeping your horse fat. And the main source of stress for most horses? Restricting forage. The very thing most people do to try to help their horse lose weight actually causes the same stress reaction that brings about body fat retention, and all its attendant problems.
I cannot emphasize this enough. Here are the physiological facts—they are indisputable: The horse is a trickle feeder. He’s a grazing animal designed to chew all day long. His chewing produces saliva, which neutralizes the acid that’s continually flowing in his stomach. Your stomach produces acid only when you eat; your horse’s stomach produces acid constantly, even when the stomach is empty (you see where I am going with this—his stomach should never be empty!). He also needs forage flowing through his digestive tract to exercise those muscles; otherwise the muscles get flabby, which can bring on colic from a weak intestinal tract that torques and intussuscepts. Furthermore, the cecum (hindgut) contains the bacteria responsible for digesting fiber from forage. But its exit and entrance are both at the top! In order for digested material to be pushed to the top, the cecum must be full. Otherwise colic can result from material left at the bottom.
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Question: About two months ago, I purchased a 6-year-old gelding for use on the trail. He has been great on the trail when we are going straight down the trail. I notice when I turn him sharply he throws his head. I have the same bit in the bridle that the previous owner used, so I know it is a bridle he is accustomed to. Is there anything else that could be causing this behavior? Debbie C.
Answer: I would recommend that you have your horse’s teeth examined by an experienced dental veterinarian as horse’s teeth continue to grow for most of their life and dental problems may develop at any time. Until 6 years old, a horse will have deciduous and permanent teeth erupting and be shedding deciduous teeth. This means that a dental examination should be scheduled every six months to ensure if problems do develop that they can be quickly corrected or treated. From six years to 20 years most horses will need an annual dental examination. During this time they will develop sharp enamel points as well as have the potential to develop many other problems, which if identified and treated early can help the horse to lead a more pain free, comfortable life.
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Bobbie as a spectator2Congratulations to our young winners of the Corral Search and Find puzzle coloring contest. Thank you to everyone who sent in an entry, and also to the many moms, dads and club advisors for helping to get those entries in the mail. I absolutely loved seeing some of the same names for this contest that I saw for the last! I added the second and third place prizes because with so many entries I just had to have more than one winner. If you are wondering how we made our selections, we put all our qualifying entry names in a pot and blindly selected the first, second and third place names. If interest from our Corral youngsters continues at this pace, we are just going to have to do more contests! So look for Morning Star Kid’s page contests in 2014 and send in those entries!
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A Breath of Fresh Air

Terry Myersby Terry Myers

In my opinion, there is nothing much better than watching a good western pleasure horse go around the pen. But if you think about our western pleasure competition today, you have a lot of horses who don’t have a natural western pleasure gait. These horses are forced to put their heads down and go slow in a way that creates a contorted, forehand heavy, head bobbing, unnatural stride. Because of the modern western pleasure lope, the term ‘trope’ was born (lope in front and trot in back). Here is the good news…AQHA and several ranch horse associations such as American Ranch Horse Associate (ARHA) are trying to offer the horse public an alternative; the ranch pleasure and ranch riding classes. These classes showcase horses that have natural forward motion while being light in their feet and responsive to the bridle.
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by Chip Jackson
Photos by Fairfield Photography

The 7th Annual Tough Enough To Wear Pink Horse Show is now in the books. And what a show it was! Stalls, entries, and most important the donation amount, all broke records again this year. New for this year was the Buckeye Nutrition’s $500 Ladies Pink Barrel Race. The ladies were flying around the new J.D. Equipment Pink Barrels and said they are looking forward to the 2014 show.

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by Kathy King
Photos by Reuss Griffiths

The big day has come and gone, pictures are circulating and I am happy to report we officially had 70 degrees and sunshine for our September 14 ride in downtown Cleveland. This ride was held in support of the 102 year old Cleveland Mounted Police (CMP) Unit. As we know, the city pays the officers, but the horses are maintained on donations. The eight horses are used for sporting events, crowd control, patrolling, public relations, collaborative work with the Cleveland Metroparks Mounted Unit at the newly acquired Lakefront Parks, and funerals to honor fallen officers. No doubt they are there to serve and protect. On the 14th of September, 2013 they served and protected 180+ horseback riders, three wagons full of riders, and six carriages drawn by miniature horses during a 90 minute ride.

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What a Horse Thinks…

Terry Myersby Terry Myers

Have you ever truly thought about what your horse is thinking? Ever thought about how they interpret their world? Growing up, people used to tell me that to be a good horseman; you have to think like a horse. But yet, no one ever would tell me how a horse thinks. Today, we have all kinds of horse psychology books and videos published by the well educated and the not so well educated. So I’m going to give you my view point from experience (no college degree here, just scars from the school of hard knocks). In past articles, I frequently referred to the rider’s instincts. Hope you liked those articles, because we are going to talk about that again, but this time from the horses’ perspective.
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Bobbie as a spectator2
It has been two years now since Joe and I bought the Horsemen’s Corral. The first year flew by and this past one has been no different. If anything we have been even busier but having the time of our lives! Have there been rough spots? oh yeah. Being new to the publishing world we of course had much to learn. Do we expect to travel more rocky roads? Sure. Considering today’s economic climate for small and medium size business owners, sometimes we face challenges beyond our control. But when we get to sit back for a few quiet moments and just contemplate, that’s what life is about; facing challenges in an ever changing world, learning from those same challenges, and always going forward.
On our second anniversary, I’d like to thank all of you; our subscribers and our advertisers, for your continuing support of the Horsemen’s Corral. And as always, we thank our wonderful staff for keeping the faith!
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Horse Auction conducted by Ralph Brown, Ohio Department of Agriculture Auction License #57199978099. November 2, 2013. 5824 Abiding Way, North Madison, OH 44057.

Auction begins 11am, preview at 10am. For details, photos and info on horses, go to http://charles-photo.com/CaromereSale/index.html

Also contact Ralph Brown at JoralStable@aol.com 440-667-3249 or cstroombeek@roadrunner.com

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So-called ‘distracted driving’ laws prohibiting cell phone use while driving are being enacted around the nation, and now it is time for the equine community to take notice, says one equine safety professional.
“It’s important for riders to remember that the horse can be an unpredictable animal,” notes Wayne G. Hipsley, chairman of HorseSafetyUSA.com. “If the rider is distracted by using his or her cell phone, and the horse reacts to something in its environment, serious injuries may be the result.” Riding a horse is like operating a vehicle, distractions can be the cause of serious injuries, and it is well documented the cell phone is a distraction while operating a car and truck.
Hipsley pointed to 12 states and the District of Columbia that prohibit drivers from using hand-held cell phones while driving. “If that is important when only one mind is involved [with driving], then it’s important when two minds—the rider and the horse—are involved.” Therefore, HorseSafetyUSA recommends not using any form of communication device while participating in equestrian activities with a horse and pony.

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All-American-QH-Congress-Loby Bobbie Coalter

The American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) is the world’s largest breed registry with over 5 million horses registered; so it’s fitting the All American Quarter Horse Congress (AAQHC) is the largest single breed horse show in the world. The event is hosted by the Ohio Quarter Horse Association (OQHA) and held at the Ohio Expo Center, (the Ohio State Fairgrounds) in Columbus, Ohio. This year the AAQHC takes place October 4-27.

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Successful Horse Trailer Training

by Dan Steers

Tackling horse trailer loading problems at the trailer is the most common mistake that horse owners make when dealing with horses that are difficult to load. The key to successful trailer training starts away from the trailer, with first establishing ground control with the horse.
When attempting to load the horse he only has four directions in which his body can move; left, right, forwards and backwards. Therefore to successfully load the horse we must have control over his body in all four directions. To achieve this, the horse must be taught hindquarter control, where the horse learns to yield its hindquarters to whip pressure; the horse must also be established in coming forward to whip pressure and be proficient in circling around the handler and being driven to the fence from a circle. Only once these ground control basics are established should the handler approach the trailer.

IMG_9577trailerTo read more about successful horse trailer training, see the October issue of the Horsemen’s Corral.

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Notes From Inside The Corral

Bobbie as a spectator2by Bobbie Coalter

 

What I love about October: the weather, the leaves, the bugs…or lack of them, trail riding, the All American Quarter Horse Congress.
What I don’t like about October: Winter is around the corner!
Yes, I’m no different than most horse people. We are all enjoying the end of our busy time of year with our equine companions and dreading having to prepare for winter. Why is it that the best time of the year has to be so short and immediately followed by the cold, wind, snow, ice and mud? Yuck! But I do have to admit that for a month or two I will enjoy being able to slow down and rest a bit.

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Realistic Expectations

Terry Myersby Terry Myers
How do you know when you have realistic expectations of your horse and yourself? If you have to ask yourself that question, you probably don’t have realistic expectations. Let me ask another question; do you think it is possible to improve a horse’s skills/knowledge by 1 percent per ride? If you say yes, are your absolutely sure? If you still answer yes, I want to hire you because that means you can have a horse 100 percent trained in 100 rides. It can’t be done. Neither horse nor rider is ever 100 percent trained. To be more specific, a horse is just getting started after 100 rides.

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Nutrena Education web

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by Susan Strawserlogo_CMYK (5x5)

Insuring your horse is not only protecting your investment when you purchased the horse, it is also protecting your finances if there is an accident or sickness.
Mortality insurance provides coverage on the life of the horse (includes theft and some colic surgery). The premium is based on the insured value of the horse, breed, use and age.
Companies have different medical options available and the most popular is major medical that covers required treatments and surgeries. You can also purchase surgical-only or colic-only endorsements.
Because companies offer different coverages at different prices, it is important to shop around with equine agencies.
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Terry Myersby Terry Myers

In my opinion, a horse can’t buck, kick or rear up if they are relaxed and square in their shoulders. Most performance problems; loping too fast, lead issues, bad reining spins, knocking over barrels in barrel patterns are all symptoms of shoulder problems. Last month we talked about things the rider can change to help correct shoulder problems. In this article we will talk about how to get your horses’ shoulders relaxed, now that you know how to sit properly in the saddle.
What we are going to talk about in this article should be very easy. However, don’t be surprised if you have trouble applying these techniques. As I always say, your instincts can be your own worst enemy.

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August has been a busy month for us both inside and outside the Corral offices. This issue once again has an insert, this time previewing the All American Quarter Horse Congress taking place in October. We have included a really slick at-a-glance reference guide to the many events taking place during the three week show. If you are trying to figure out which days to attend Congress based on your favorite events, start with this guide. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank Michelle, our Arts and Composition Director, Andi, Mary and Joe, our super sales people, our advertisers, and the Ohio Quarter Horse Association for making this insert possible.

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Bobbie as a spectator2

I grew up in Cleveland, my dad grew up in Cleveland, and my grandpa moved to Cleveland from Saskatchewan Canada after World War I with his war bride from England. I just learned last year from my dad, that while growing up on the family ranch in Canada, grandpa caught and trained wild horses and rode in the Calgary Stampede, the ultimate rodeo according to Joe. I also didn’t know until recently that when he applied for his job as a Cleveland policeman, he initially was supposed to be a member of the mounted unit. My grandmother put the breaks on that though since she was scared my grandfather would get hurt. I guess she thought being a mounted policeman was a lot more dangerous than being a beat cop. I don’t know about that, especially back in the 1920s ‘30s and ‘40s, but I sure wish my grandma had been a little more horse savvy so she wouldn’t have insisted my grandpa leave the mounted unit.
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It’s All About The Shoulders

by Terry Myers

Terry Myers
Having trouble with your horse bucking or rearing? Barring any physical problems, your problem is in your horse’s shoulders. Problems with collection? It’s a shoulder problem. Horse loping too fast? Yep—it’s a shoulder problem. Knocking down a barrel in your barrel pattern? Definitely a shoulder problem. Missing leads or lousy spins in reining? You guessed it—shoulder problem.
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The Cleveland Mounted Police Unit

by Kathy King
Co-host, Cuyahoga County Farm Bureau

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The Cleveland Mounted Police Unit has a rich history that spans over 100 years. I remember my first encounter with a Mounted Officer in downtown Cleveland. I was working and had come out for walk on E. 12th Street on my break when I heard a familiar clip clop. From that day in 1997 forward, I was hooked and always on the look-out for these steeds as I walked to Public Square.
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by Bobbie Coalter
Photos courtesy of Courtney Leasure

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Editor’s Note: This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. There will be many events honoring this time in our history, including the Pennsylvania Quarter Horse Associations Gettysburg Ride, September 13-15. The Horsemen’s Corral is honored to take part in this event. We will participate in the trail ride and Joe will be the MC and conduct Cowboy Church. Come join us for the ride, campfire,ghost stories and fellowship as we honor the many soldier, civilians and equines that lost their lives from July 1-3, 1863.

Horses have long been retired from the United States military, but back during the Civil War, a bloody and tragic time in our history, horses and other equines were as necessary to the Union and Confederate soldiers as military vehicles are to our modern day soldiers. Both armies used equines to carry equipment to the front lines, men into battle and the injured to camp hospitals. Most horses did not survive their enlistment, since shooting and killing them first during a battle meant a disadvantage to the enemy; cavalrymen ended up on foot making an easy target, and artillery could not be moved into strategic positions. General George Armstrong Custer is said to have 11 mounts shot out from under him during the war, including two in one day at the Battle of Gettysburg.
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Tiny Cowboy
The Promise of Youth. This adorable picture of little cowboy Craig Miller started me thinking about the future of the equine industry. At 22 months this pint size cowboy is all in, but where will he be with horses 22 years from now? Will he be trail riding, competing, training, or maybe graduating from an Equine studies program? Will he still be involved with horses in any way; or will the demands of his young adult years make a life with horses impossible, allowing for only his memories to be tied to them?
The American Horse Council reports that there are 6.9 million horses in the United States for both commercial and recreational use and the total impact of the industry on the gross domestic product (GDP) is 112.1 billion dollars. These are impressive numbers but we all know that the industry is in trouble. When looking at predictions for the future, experts agree that land loss and the lack of interest and involvement of young people are the two greatest threats it’s facing.
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Horses and Alfalfa

by Eleanor Blazer

Is alfalfa best hay for horses?

The word alfalfa comes from the Arabic word “alfasfasha”.  Loosely translated it means “the best fodder”.
But, is it?

Read entire article by subscribing to the Horsemen’s Corral.

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The EIA Myth: how your equine veterinarian is scamming you! is the latest Kindle book by author, trainer, trader and teacher Don Blazer.

“The dangers of EIA (equine infectious anemia) are a made-up crisis designed to keep cash rolling in year after year by requiring a Coggins test on all horses going to public places or crossing state lines,” Blazer says.

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Early Rangerbred History

The cornerstone for the Rangerbred Horse was laid in 1878 when General U.S. Grand, during a world tour, visited Sultan Abdul Hamid of Turkey. As a token of deep friendship, the old Sultan presented the General with two desert stallions on the day of his departure. One was an Arabian named Leopard, the other a Barb named Linden Tree.
These stallions reached Virginia early in 1879 where they attracted the attention of one of America’s greatest horsemanship, Randolph Huntington of New York and Virginia.

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Not Just a Trail Horse Anymore…

Whether you are a mounted shooter, team roper, barrel racer or a pleasure rider, your horse will benefit from time away from the stress and routine of an arena. Keeping a horse mentally fresh is a key part of success inside the arena, and the American Competitive Trail Horse Association (ACTHA) is a great way to do just that.
Co-founder Carrie Scrima formed the Texas-originated ACTHA as a way for families and friends to get together and demonstrate their horsemanship skills out on the trail. This is not a speed, ‘extreme -type’ or endurance event, it’s a safe casual pace which covers an average of six miles and has a minimum of six judged obstacles. Judged obstacles are as natural as possible and can range from crossing water, stepping over logs, opening gates to going up and down embankments. Rides take around two to two and a half hours. Rides start with a briefing before trail riders head out, followed by lunch and awards.

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Test Business

[noteaser]Events II[/noteaser]

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[noteaser]Events II[/noteaser]

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Rodeo Voice Entertainment, LLC

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Rodeo Voice Entertainment, LLC
The professional voice of choice for rodeos, bull riding, barrel racing, fundraisers, horse shows and commercial voice over.
Phone:(330)635-4145
Website:http://www.rodeovoice.com
Email:joe@rodeovoice.com

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Shawn Thorsell – Trainer

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Shawn Thorsell – Trainer
Shawn Thorsell
Professional Horseman
Now accepting horses for training. Performance or pleasure, arena or trail, all breeds and disciplines.

Phone:(330)234-2440

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AFW Photography

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AFW Photography
Contact Amber Faith Waggoner for all your photography needs.

Phone 1: (740)765-4002
Phone 2: (740)424-8008
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/afwphotography1
Email: amberfaith333@gmail.com
Address:
2580 Twp. Hwy. 220 ,
Bloomingdale, Ohio 43910
United States

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Pronghorn Custom Leather

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Pronghorn Custom Leather
Custom made holsters, gun belts, tack & saddle repairs, cleaning & restoration. Member of NRA Life, NAHC Life, SASS
Phone 1: (419)846-3403
Phone 2: (330)242-3873

Address:
9336 N. Elyria Road ,
West Salem, Ohio 44287
United States

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Rodeo Voice

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The Corral Welcomes Our New Feature Writers From Double Dan Horsemanship – Dan Steers & Dan James

When Dan James and I met on the El Caballo Spanish Horse Centre in Western Australia we quickly realized that our training styles complemented each other so we developed and began performing a show together called “The Dan and Dan Show”. In 2009, we left Western Australia moving to New South Wales to begin training with one of the world’s elite liberty horse trainers, Heath Harris. Heath, having more than 40 years of experience welcomed us into his program and willingly shared his training techniques.  Dan James and I took the knowledge that Heath had shared with us and developed the Double Dan Horsemanship training method: Ground Control, Long Reining, Body Control Under Saddle and Liberty.
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